March 20: Rally & Hearing Against Chevron’s Dirty Crude Refining Expansion!

20 03 2008

CLEAN AIR, HEALTHY KIDS, NOT DIRTY CRUDE!

Thursday, March 20, 2008
6:15 – Rally Outside of Richmond City Hall
7:00 – Planning Commission Hearing (bring food and snacks– we need folks to stay for the whole hearing!). To testify people need to sign up before 7pm and 1-3 minute public testimony will take place around 10pm.

Richmond City Council
1401 Marina Way South (past Regatta)

*Carpool-Offer a Ride or Catch one at 5:45 Richmond BART (510 967-7377)
* AC transit bus #74 stops near by
* Driving Directions: From Oakland/East of Richmond:Take I-580 W. Take the CUTTING BLVD exit toward HARBOUR WAY SOUTH. Turn RIGHT onto CUTTING BLVD. Turn RIGHT onto MARINA WAY S.

Community Demands:

* No Increase In pollution! Reduce Current Pollution Levels!
* Environmental justice, worker justice and right to know are a must!
* Chevron’s expansion must provide a meaningful
public review process, including considering alternatives to refining dirtier crude!
* Recirculation of the EIR! Suspend the approval process until there is full disclosure of changes in crude oil stock & its impacts!

We are encouraging all residents of Richmond and surrounding communities (Bay Area-wide) to make testimony at this hearing. Please demand that the Planning Commission suspend the process, recirculate the Final EIR (environmental impact report) as it is missing emissions data and does not disclose the true scope of this project.

Additionally, let them know that you don’t want any dirtier crude refined in Richmond.

See Communities for a Better Environment.
See the agenda on the hearing and more info.

For more information please contact:
Jessica Tovar 510-302-0430 ext 24
Dr Henry Clark 510- 232-3427

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March 15: Chevron Direct Action and Rally

14 03 2008

DIRECT ACTION & RALLY: CHEVRON RICHMOND REFINERY
cosponsored by Greenaction, West County Toxics Coalition, Amazon Watch, Richmond Progressive Alliance, Richmond Greens, Community Health Initiative, Communities for a Better Environment, Global Exchange, and Rainforest Action Network.

IMPORTANT INFO: Print DASW’s Map (PDF) and Orientation Sheet (PDF) for March 15!

9 – 11am – Check out or join the Bay Area Peace Navy! (We know the Coast Guard will be!)

11am­ Rally at Judge G. Carroll Park
W. Cutting Blvd & S. Garrard Blvd, Richmond (map)

1pm­ Nonviolent Direct Action at Chevron Refinery
100 Chevron Way, Richmond (map)
(Free shuttle buses will leave from Richmond BART and Point Richmond – 3rd St. and Chesley Ave – at 9:30am, 10:30 AM, 11:30 AM and 12:30 PM.)

Join the March 15 & 19 DASW Text Mob to stay updated through the day:
Send a text to 40404 with the words “follow dasw” (case sensitive, no quotation marks). Standard rates apply.

The National Lawyers Guild legal hotline for arrestees is 415-285-1011. View the Direct Action to Stop the War Legal website.

The purpose of this action is shut the Chevron refinery down for the day, and to support community efforts to stop Chevron from expanding its refinery, which will increase pollution and cause asthma, cancer and rising death rates in surrounding communities. Chevron is driving the war and occupation in Iraq, refining over a million barrels of stolen Iraqi oil in Richmond a month, and actively lobbying for the privatization of Iraq¹s oil fields so companies like Chevron can seize control of them. Join us, and help send a clear message to Chevron: Stop stealing Iraqi oil, and stop polluting our communities! See our Chevron fact sheet. (Chevron fact sheet with footnotes.)

We will shut down the Richmond Chevron refinery by land, by bike, and by sea. We’re asking that you form an affinity group, and help us shut down Chevron. Here’s some ways you can plug in and help out:

1. Get together with a group of your friends, and help blockade the refinery (please check in with the Chevron working group if you want to do this – their email address is dasw.chevron [at] gmail.com).

2. To get involved in with the bike brigade, contact Bria at brihannala [at] gmail.com.

3. If you have a boat, you can join the ‘DASW Yacht Club! If you’re interested in this, please contact dasw.chevron [at] gmail.com.

4. If these options don’t sound appealing to you, there are many, many other important roles you can play in this action. Please come to the next Chevron organizing meeting (check back for details).

5. If helping organize this action isn’t something you have time for, you can just show up at Carroll Park (W. Cutting Blvd. and S. Garrard Blvd.
in Richmond) on March 15th, at 11am. And please tell your friends!





Chevron first in line for new Iraq oil deals

6 02 2008

Another reason to come out on March 15!

From the Financial Times:

Iraq pushes ahead with oil plans
Financial Times of London
By Roula Khalaf and Dino Mahtani in London

Published: February 5 2008 18:30 | Last updated: February 5 2008 18:30

The Iraqi government is inviting major oil multinationals to participate for the first time in the development of the oil industry, without waiting for the passage of crucial but controversial hydrocarbons legislation.

In a sign that the oil law the US has been pressing for is unlikely to be agreed by parliament any time soon, Hussain Shahristani, Iraq’s oil minister, said in an interview with the Financial Times that Iraq was now determined to push ahead with plans to raise production from a current 2.5m barrels per day to 6m bpd in five years.

Speaking on the sidelines of a conference in London, he said major companies were registering to pre-qualify for oil development licences before the February 18 deadline. The process, he said, should lead next year to the award of the first contracts to develop oil fields across the country.

Oil giants, so far deterred from Iraq by violence and the absence of clear legislation, are showing keen interest in the pre-qualification process. It marks the first opportunity to tap into a country with the world’s third largest proved oil reserves and a largely undeveloped oil industry with low production costs.

But the companies will no doubt require more legislative clarity and further improvements in security before committing substantial investment. Jeroen van der Veer, Royal Dutch Shell’s chief executive officer, said last week: “We are in the race so to say, we would like to work in Iraq but the petroleum law is not ratified so we don’t know the conditions. We would like to know the rules of the game.”

While eyeing more long-term relationships with Iraq, major companies are negotiating technical support contracts to get their foot in the door and help raise production of several oil fields by 500,000 bpd this year. These deals do not involve putting teams on the ground and are confined to offering arms-length technical and managerial assistance. The companies include Royal Dutch Shell and BP as well as US giants ExxonMobil and Chevron.

The exact terms of the longer-term development contracts have not been decided yet, according to Mr Shahristani.

The minister said a “model contract” would be worked out, compensating companies for bringing in technology and financial resources while guaranteeing full government ownership and control of oil.

One senior western oil executive said the exact nature of the contract was not necessarily controversial. “I don’t mind as long as you get part of the upside,” he said.

Mr Shahristani’s decision to bypass an oil law reflects the government’s frustration with the Kurdish regional government, which has been seeking more independence on oil policy, fuelling a protracted dispute with other parliamentary groups.

The Iraqi cabinet approved the oil law a year ago but has since been unable to pass it through parliament, partly due to disagreements over the sharing of oil revenues between regions.

The government in the Kurdish north, meanwhile, has passed its own oil law and has been signing exploration contracts with western companies, causing anger in the central government. Mr Shahristani has warned that these contracts are illegal and companies involved in the contracts could be blacklisted.

The minister denied that the decision to move ahead with development contracts was primarily a tactical move designed to put pressure on the Kurdish bloc, however.

“Iraq has lost decades of opportunity and we’ve lost a year discussing a draft law. Now the government has decided to go full speed ahead in developing these fields,” he said. “We owe it to the Iraqi people to develop oil resources well.”